The Elves and the Shoemaker

When stocking for an emergency or survival situation, people generally think to stock food, water, and building materials first. These are all good things to think about and could potentially save your life.

However, what about having a stock of clothing?

A lot of people forget they’re going to need extra clothing during an emergency or survival situation, and not having the proper clothing could mean death. Every emergency shelter or store should be equipped with different outdoor clothing. This means wool pants, coats, and socks. Wool will keep you warm even when it gets wet, making it the perfect survival clothing. Have an extra stock of undergarments, sleeping wear, and even shoes.

Shoes are one of the most important things to have in your survival clothing kit. Along with stocking extra shoes, it would be even more beneficial to know how to make your own shoes just in case you find yourself without a pair. Cold and wet feet can lead to hypothermia fast, even if you’re wearing wool everywhere else.

Knowing how to make shoes isn’t just a fun hobby, it’s a valuable skill to have on the road to becoming self-sufficient.

Shoes can be made from several different types of materials, and every culture has a unique way to make shoes. Some cultures use similar material; others use material that might seem odd. Some materials include:

1. Eel skins
2. Leather from all kind of animals like deer, elk, reindeer, and moose.
3. Wood
4. Tires

As you can see, the supplies for making shoes can be found just about anywhere, even in urban settings. No matter where you get stranded, you have most of the materials you need to make some new footwear should the situation require it. These are the primary materials used to make the bulk of the shoes, but there is also some secondary materials and equipment you need to stitch it all together. Some of the equipment will include:

1. Waxed thread for sewing
2. A leather needle
3. A sharp knife
4. Buckles
5. Nylon straps
6. Circular saw or a band saw

All these materials and equipment will make shoes out of leather and old tires, which are probably the most common and easiest to make in a survival situation or for your survival stores.

The benefit of making shoes with leather is that they’re easy to put together. The downside is that you need leather to make them. This means either killing a deer, or using a lot of tanned squirrel hides. If you need shoes fast, moccasins may not be your best bet.

However, if you have leather readily available, go ahead and make a few pairs. You never know when you might need them. Making sandals from old tires is a great recycling option. If you’re in a survival situation in the woods, you might not find any tires nearby, but having a few in your stock is handy. They take forever to wear out, and they only require two materials to make.

The Whole Truth And Nothing But The Truth,

Jonathan Chambers

What is White Nationalism, today?

The Roper Report

By Billy Roper

Some of the following is anecdotal, some derives from decades of personal experience in the movement, and the rest is compiled from previously written and published articles, essays, and letters from various White Nationalist websites, by various authors, paraphrased and expounded upon by myself.

The White Nationalist movement is a bit like the six blind men feeling an elephant. The first touches the side and thinks it must be a wall; the second touches the tusk and thinks it must be a spear; the third touches the trunk and thinks it must be a snake; the fourth touches the leg and thinks it must be a tree; the fifth touches the ear and thinks it must be a fan; and the sixth touches the tail and thinks it must be a rope.

“So the disputants rail on in ignorance
Of what each other mean,
And prate about…

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Fall Semester 2017 ShieldWall Network Academic Scholarship

The Roper Report

The Shieldwall Network is renewing the Shieldwall Network Academic Scholarship for the fall, 2017 semester. The SWN will continue to offer a $250 scholarship each semester for approved colleges and universities for matriculating high school seniors and/or entering collegiate freshman who are eighteen years of age or older. However, consideration may be given to applicants in subsequent undergraduate or graduate years of secondary education. The SWN will not make a public acknowledgement of award recipients at their request.

August 18, 2017 will be the application cut-off date for the 2017 fall semester scholarship, awarded to students who presented the best crafted answers to the following application essay questions. Please scan and submit a copy of your high school academic transcript, and attach a (roughly) 2-page essay response to the following two questions by August 18th to this email address:  Karlnerger16@yahoo.com.

Choose three counties in Europe that have received at…

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Third Victory Against Antifa In Less Than A Month!

The Roper Report

The ShieldWall Network and its allies in the League of the South and The Knights Party, supported by many local citizens, have achieved their third victory in less than a month against Antifa!

On May 27th, The Redneck Revolt/John Brown Gun Club cancelled their scheduled anti-White rally in Harrison, Arkansas for the second time, out of fear that they would be opposed by Billy Roper and The ShieldWall Network. The League of the South and the Knights Party stood with The ShieldWall Network and White Lives Matter that day, earning an easy victory when Antifa punked out and refused to show up.

Two weeks later, on June 10th, The ShieldWall Network held an Anti-Sharia Rally in Batesville, Arkansas, supported by local citizens, which garnered national media attention. Antifa did show up for that event, but were too frightened to bring out the weapons they had brought to attempt the violence…

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Funeral Expenses For Sadie

Cover Our People With Love

To help with funeral expenses click here

BE KIND TO ONE ANOTHER’: SADIE L. RIGGS’ HEARTBREAKING OBITUARY

Miss Sadie L. Riggs, 15, of Bedford, took her own life on Monday, June 19th, 2017.

Sadie was born in Bedford on December 4, 2001. She is survived by her father, Eric Riggs and step mother Alicia Smith of Bedford and her biological mother, Beverly (Dodson) Riggs of Hopewell and by her motherly aunt, Sarah Smith, with whom she resided.

In addition to her parents, she is survived by Brother- Colby Wilson, California; Sister- Sheena Riggs, Defiance; Brother- Gaiege Dodson, Indiana, PA; Brother- Micah Riggs, Bedford; Sister- Rylee Riggs, Bedford; Brother- Dreygan Oberman, New Enterprise; Brother- Greyson Oberman, New Enterprise; Sister- Milaunna Dodson, Hopewell; Grandmother- Darlene Hall, Hopewell; Grandmother- Patricia J. Riggs, Bedford; Grandfather- Jeff Smith, Bedford; Grandmother- Stephanie Wallace, Bedford; Great Grandfather- Warren Feaster companion of Delores Materkowski, Bedford; Great Grandmother- Deanna…

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Have we lost our way?

Preparing to survive after a major disaster is so much more than stockpiling supplies. If we ever face an end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it scenario, we’re going to need much more than supplies if we want to rebuild society. We’re going to need skills.

Farming, blacksmithing, woodworking… These types of skills were fairly commonplace in the 1800’s. But today only a tiny percentage of people know how to do these things. It’s those people who will lead the way after society collapses.

If you want to be a true survivalist, then you need to be the type of person who could go back in time to the pioneer days and get along just fine.

Butchering is something you will have to learn one way or another. You need to know how to properly cut and hang an animal so you don’t contaminate the meat. There is an art to the process of butchering an animal you have taken from the wild.

Herbal medicine will help you take care of yourself and your family members in a world without drug stores. That’s why you should learn how to identify medicinal plants that are found in the wild and how to use them to cure your ailments.

Blacksmithing is a trade that is extremely outdated, but it will come back when large manufacturing companies are no longer around. Iron and steel will need to be forged the old-fashioned way. And because it involves extreme heat, you will need to know what you are doing.

Horse care could become a necessary skill if horses come back into fashion due to a lack of fuel for vehicles. Few people know how to ride horses, which was the main method of transportation up until 100 years ago. Learning how to ride a horse and care for one will be critical to your survival.

Hunting is extremely regulated today, but when it’s the only way to put food on the table, you better know how to do it. It requires some skill and knowledge of animal tracking and how they move. You also need to know the best times to go hunting and where to shoot an animal to kill it with one shot without contaminating the meat.

Shoemaking isn’t something anybody thinks about anymore, but when their shoes are worn out and they can’t buy new ones, they’ll be thinking about it a lot. You’ll want to learn how to cut soles and use leather to cover your feet. Shoes will be an absolute necessity to protect your feet when you’re outside.

Woodworking used to be a common hobby up until 50 or 60 years ago. Unfortunately, technology has pushed out skills that were more hands on. Woodworking will be vital for making beds, dressers, cabinets, and anything else made of wood. It isn’t technically one of the most necessary skills, but it will be a valuable trade once things settle down a bit.

Of course, these are just a few of the skills our ancestors had.

For example, many pioneers also knew how to make beer, cheese, knives, and even large structures like grain mills, root cellars, and smoke houses.

Can you think of any other survival skills our ancestors had that our society has forgotten?

Remember, we’re all in this together,

Derek Paulson

Q. and A. Survival

by Selco, a Yugoslavian Civil War survivor.

I asked you in one of my previous posts what you would like to see or read here on blog and your answers were great, actually I did not expect so many comments and questions.

There are some comments and demands about topics that I already wrote here yes, and there are some new. Since number of questions is huge, I will every now and then, publish one post with my answers and comments on some of your questions.

Some questions will require an entire post alone.

So here are few:

Selco,

Respectfully, I would ask three questions:

  1. How did people most often arrive at the decision to give up, and stop surviving?
  2. How did others (family, group, squad) etc. handle that when became apparent?
  3. How was it most competently handled by the group when a member did that?

Regards.

Ivan

Thanks Ivan.

When you are thrown into a survival situation, decision to give up is not so much connected with the lack of food, safety, water, services etc.

Usually it is connected to the realization (of the person who is giving up) of the fact that there is no clear clue when all things will come back to normal (when he again gonna have food, water, security etc.)

When you go days into fighting, starving etc- surviving is a process where you push your body and mind more and more, and if you “look too far into distance” and there is no clear evidences that things will get better – your will can be crushed very easily.

You may conclude that “it is not worth it”, and then that’s it.

I know it is generalization but yes, you need not to look too far and to have high hopes, you just need to operate in your small circles and push day by day.

It was bad thing to see, and it happened, often. Good “cure” for it was that you need to find use or task for that person, you need to bring back a sense of purpose to them.

Easier way was to find job for them -taking care for food, watching for the kids, anything  that would make them feel useful.

If member of the group “ gave up” and if the group structure was ‘family’ then usually other members try to give some support or if that failed then just leave him alone in terms of duties and everything, nobody had too much time for psychological help in that days.

If group meant several people “bonded” together by chance or temporary need (no big and strong connections between them) then other, harder, measures were in place.

 

 

Thank you once again Selco for showing us that the positive side of humanity is always capable of returning and surviving.

What I have always wanted to really know is; what is it like to be in a SHTF situation when the UN troops are there?

What are the UN troops REALLY like?

How to best act / behave / handle UN troops?

I ask because I have heard both positive and very negative things about UN troops. I simply ask for the truth here.

Thanks Again !!!

GRA

 

You heard good GRA.

UN troops were patched together from the different Army contingents, so there were British contingents, Spanish contingent, Pakistani,  Portuguese, Dutch etc.

Looking at the big picture they did horrible job because they were under armed, desperately badly coordinated between different contingents and without clear cause and function and political support.

So in reality we had situation where two opposed local units are in the middle of fight and each unit is around 2000-3000 men strong with tanks and artillery and suddenly there is UN unit moving in with 5 APC’s and 50 men in order to make ceasefire, and of course everybody shoot at them or simply take their stuff and make hostages of them.

They did not have clear tasks, political will behind them and firepower.

On the local level, when it come to individual members of those UN forces, I have seen cases where they simply break the clear orders and attack some guys in order to save civilians.

So there were good people there, but horrible organization behind them.

They did save people, evacuate injured civilians or get shot while they tried to bring food in areas where people starved..

They smuggled food sometimes sell it to us for different kind of things (or services)… All different kind of things, but I like to think lot of people among them were trying to do good stuff.

When it comes to fighting capabilities I remember the British army as a tough guys.

Those were UN forces, they failed to make peace, later came International forces (US led) with clear will and duties and we all here were fed up with slaughtering already, and what was most important with huge amount of force, and by the shear amount of force they succeed to bring peace, it was philosophy of : “who ever keeps firing after this date will be leveled by us”.

And it worked.

How to handle UN troops?

Every “UN troops” deployments are doomed unless they are coming with HUGE amount of force and in great numbers, or they coming  into the region where any kind of will for resistance is crushed long time ago.

As an addition to your questions and since I am aware of other comments (and worries) about “UN forces on US soil” I really have to say my opinion- it is kind of fantasy.

Numbers in US, numbers of weapon in US make any kind of “UN troops coming to US to pacify us” simply and clearly impossible.

To “pacify” somebody you need force several times bigger then opponent, and you need it on the ground usually, and you need some kind (to some extent) will to be pacified.

 

I’d like to hear about how you bartered for things you needed.

What were valuable items for barter? Was the local currency still worth something?

Were foreign currencies used? What about gold or silver jewelry or coins?

How were you able to ensure your safety during barter transactions? What did you do if you found out you had been cheated?

Little L

I did write about this topic already, but since it is important topic (and one of the favorite on blogs and with lot of myths too) I will answer it in short.

First and most important is that nothing was pre-set, nothing was constant and that include basic factors like values of items, security of trade, rules of particular trade etc.

As the situation worsened more into the direction of real SHTF situation people started to appreciate (and look for) usable items, and when I say that, I mean items that solve your immediate problems.

So for example if you had precious artistic picture that in normal times is worth around 10 000 Euros you could not do to much with that in terms of trade because simply people did not care for that, they were hungry, wet, cold, dirty, without enough weapons and bullets.

Maybe you could find some war lord who had connections with outside (normal) world and he could maybe give you 20 cans of meat for that art because he know you are starving.

Or in other case he could simply take it from you (and maybe kill you or not) because he is warlord and you are nobody.

Now this is something that can be transferred also in terms of owning precious metals for SHTF.

When SHTF it will worth much less simply because you can not eat it, or you can not shoot from gold coin to someone, yes you can try to buy weapon with gold coins or food (at outrageous price, and with danger of getting killed) but what is the point? Why not store food and weapons in the first place?

Gold and silver jewelry or coins in form of small rings and necklasses as a temporary bribe in some situations works really cool, and as a stash when some kind of society jump back in (when SHTF ends) is good idea too.

But in the middle of SHTF I prefer more usable items.

In my case local currency worked in the beginning stage of SHTF, but it was very short period, then foreign currency jumped in (US dollars and German marks) and as situation worsen prices of things for marks and dollars went up very sharp, and also situations where you could buy something with it become rare-people started to trade.

Ensuring safety during transactions (trade) was problem, but common sense was to never go alone on trades (3 is good number) to trade with known people (returning trades) or to go to trade on confirmed information (you get information about trader from trusted person who already traded with him)

Of course very often you could only go in 3’s, all else was unknown, so you took the risk.

To have rumor (or information) about you that you are bad trader (cheater-you gave bad item to someone) was bad because rumor then goes around and no one want to trade with you.

Also revenges for bad trades were hard and sometimes final.

But for example it was not always about physical punishments, guy cheated me once with some things and I simply “spread” out information on correct places that he mixed plaster and similar things in his wheat (for trade), and soon he was simply “scammer” and nobody wanted to works with him.

By the way it was lie, his stuff was good, but it is an example of how things worked.

 

I hope these answers help? Let me know in the comments below if anything was of specific use or interest to you…?  I’ll be answering more of your questions in future posts!

Great Depression II: The Sequel

We have already been through the worst economic times in modern history. It’s still debatable as to whether the current economic strife–kicked off in 2007–is worse than the 1970s, although it can’t be many more months of recession until that era is certainly surpassed.

Does anyone see the light at the end of this tunnel?

The simple answer is no.

With the euro crisis dragging everyone down and with the BRICs countries crashing, the bottom of this slump still seems well into the future. If this is the case, the agenda for many of us is survival. Another four years of this economic environment will be a harsh road.

A survival situation doesn’t necessarily have to be a theatrical disaster, a zombie apocalypse or even a natural disaster that dilapidates the country. Economic survival doesn’t sound as “sexy” as the aforementioned, but by ignoring it we set ourselves up for a world of pain.

So, how to we prepare for a Depression?

First things first, find more income. Second, third, even fourth incomes are wonderful things. Many people use sites like ADVFN and become private investors, using guide books to help teach them the tricks of the trade.

As most of us live up to our incomes, money from occasional work and opportunities act as ‘windfall money’. In the end, most peoples’ discretionary income is a very small fraction of total income, so a few hundred dollars out of the blue from other activities does amount to a big win.

Whether it’s selling stuff on eBay, or offering B and B, you can’t have too many strings to your financial bow, especially when dark economic clouds are looming.

Also, keep your job. In the ‘good old days,’ many people could walk out of a job and straight into another. Long gone are the days you could get a job simply by driving into a different corporate car park and go knocking.

Of course, most sensible people know that staying employed is now more important than ever, still, it doesn’t do any harm to be reminded that people in jobs are inside the castle and those out of work are marooned in a harsh wilderness.

During the 1930’s it wasn’t hard times for everybody. The securely employed didn’t suffer the privations of those out of work.

Meanwhile, those who can just about happily retire should think about putting a bit more aside before departing the world of work for good. If we are in for another four to eight years of depression, retirement fund assumptions could shrink a lot. It might be worth at least waiting until you think the global crisis is over before cutting the cord to your work income.

Always Safe, Always Prepared

Frank Mitchell

Naked and Afraid

The contestants on Naked and Afraid probably wish they had taken a crash course in textiles before they shipped out. I don’t know about you, but I was raised with a little modesty, and enough smarts to avoid the casting calls for stupid reality TV shows.

But if the money was right, and I decided to display my bare buttocks to the world while attempting to survive in a harsh environment, you can bet my derriere wouldn’t be exposed for long. I’d find the best local materials to twist into string, and then weave the string into some clothing and footwear. We’ll talk about how.

First, collect some fiber. Hundreds of species of plants, vines, and trees around the globe have a fibrous inner bark. Strip off a large amount of this fiber and shred it into long strips. Grab a long strip with a small diameter and twist it until it kinks. Hold the kink, and keep twisting each bundle of fiber.

If you twisted clockwise to begin the cord, then keep twisting the fiber bundles clockwise, allowing them to encircle each other counter clockwise. It is the opposing force that make will make the line strong. Splice in new fibers to continue twisting as long a line as you need.

Once you have dozens of yards of string, you can start thinking about weaving and looms.

You might imagine knitting and crocheting to be the domain of sweet little grannies, but those skills allow you to crank out hats, socks, sweaters, and pretty much anything else you’d need from the clothing department.

However, knitting and crocheting aren’t easy skills to master. Creating a primitive loom is a lot easier for most folks to accomplish, and the squares of cloth they produce can be sewn into almost anything.

To make your loom, tie four softwood sticks together to make a square or rectangle. Use small metal nails, wooden pegs, or sharp hardwood thorns (like honey locust or hawthorn) to create pegs on opposing sides of the frame perimeter. This could also be done with stakes in the ground, or lines hanging from another line (as in net making). For the loom, wind some of your string back and forth between two opposing sets of pegs, tying off each end of the line.

Now tie off a new line to the first line, and start weaving the new line over/under—back and forth, just like you did when making that potholder for mom at summer camp. Each course should be pushed tight to the prior one.

In ancient times, the weaver would make the cloth and a second tradesman, the fuller, would tighten the cloth. But if you’re in survival mode, you’ll need to take care of it all yourself. Remove the textile from the loom, tie off any loose ends when finished, and use it as you see fit.

The Whole Truth And Nothing But The Truth,

Jonathan Chambers

Make like a tree and leaf

Until his mid-twenties, my Dad slept on what’s called a Shuck Bed. This is a mattress stuffed with dried corn husks. He recalls it being a little lumpy, but functional. It hasn’t been very long since people used natural vegetation insulation for sleeping purposes.

Our last Afternoon Alert was about survival hacks you can accomplish with leaves. There are so many uses, the topic deserves another installment. The Shuck Bed is not the only thing leaves can be used for……

Have you ever thought of leaf roof shingles? Large leaves from plants like burdock and skunk cabbage can be used to shingle a lean-to in a matter of minutes. Leafy branches can be used the same way. Remember to start from the bottom and work your way up, just like you would shingle a house. This overlapping pattern prevents rain from seeping through.

With a little creativity, you can use leaves to direct and harvest water. Rain water is the easiest form of fresh drinking water in the wild if you can get enough of it. Arranging leaves to harvest rain can gather exponentially more if you do it right. Look at them as nature’s little mini-tarps.

From plates to bowls, leaves can be repurposed in all types of different functional ways. I use basswood leaves for plates and napkins all the time. They’re edible, durable and environmentally safe! 

And lettuce not forget the most obvious use for leaves; food! I can’t even list all the wild plant leaves that are edible. I’ve eaten leaves raw, baked, roasted, dried and often use them as wraps instead of tortillas.

One of my favorite wild meals is shredded bluegill mixed with yellow wood sorrel and wrapped in basswood leaves. I also love young basswood leaves, dandelion greens and wood sorrel mixed in a salad with a little olive oil and vinegar. 

Do you have any secret survival hacks using leaves?

Remember, we’re all in this together,

Derek Paulson